Audax Policies

Last Modified: 12/05/2020

Audax Australia Constitution

Audax Australia Regulations

Audax Australia Policies and Rules

Audax Australia Guidelines and Recommendations

The grievance procedure is set out under the Audax Australia Constitution.

  1. The grievance procedure set out in this rule applies to disputes under this Constitution between:
    1. a Member and another Member; or
    2. a Member and the Association.
  2. The parties to the dispute must meet and discuss the matter in dispute, and, if possible, resolve the dispute within 14 days after the dispute comes to the attention of all of the parties.
  3. If the parties are unable to resolve the dispute at the meeting, or if a party fails to attend that meeting, then the parties must, within 10 days, hold a meeting in the presence of a mediator.
  4. The mediator must be:
    1. a person chosen by agreement between the parties; or
    2. in the absence of agreement:
      1. in the case of a dispute between a Member and another Member, a person appointed by the National Committee; or
      2. in the case of a dispute between a Member and the Association, a person who is a mediator appointed or employed by the Dispute Settlement Centre of Victoria (Department of Justice).
  5. A Member can be a mediator.
  6. The mediator cannot be a Member who is a party to the dispute.
  7. The parties to the dispute must, in good faith, attempt to settle the dispute by mediation.
  8. The mediator, in conducting the mediation, must:
    1. give the parties to the mediation process every opportunity to be heard;
    2. allow due consideration by all parties of any written statement submitted by any party; and
    3. ensure that natural justice is accorded to the parties to the dispute throughout the mediation process.
  9. The mediator must not determine the dispute.
  10. If the mediation process does not result in the dispute being resolved, the parties may seek to resolve the dispute in accordance with the Act or otherwise at law.

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4 Comments

  1. John Mills says:

    Hi,
    I would like to see some recommendations in the safety section regarding the importance of not only being seen by drivers but that riders SEE THE DRIVER.

    I believe a good driver is a defensive driver. That requires the skills of
    1. ‘situational awareness’ (knowing what is around them that might affect the way they control their vehcilt to avoid accidents.
    2. using that knowledge of the surrounding situation to adjust their speed, position on the road, and possibly the need to change course entirely,
    3. Having the skills and vehicle roadworthiness to safely and effectively be able to make those changes.

    Of course having a good knowledge base helps considerably – past expereince, learned knowledge from various sources, . . .

    I believe that all of the above is just as applicable to cyclists as to drivers. We are in control of a vehicle. We are on the roads . . .

    One of the most important pieces of equipment on a motor vehicle is the rear view mirror.

    I would like to see some encouragement/recommendation that our Auda cyclists seriously consider the fitting of a ‘fit for purpose’ rear view mirror.

    by’fit for purpose’ I mean a mirror that is able to give the rider a good image of vehicles that are at least 400m away, or even more. Curved mirrors do not do that.

    As a driving instructor of about ten years experience the first step in the defensive driving regime called ‘a system of car control’ (that I believe was devoloped by the US Air Force (to address their high motor vehicle casualty rate) is to observe what is happening around them – observational skills – scanning, just as a good pilot does to avoid mid-air collisions, and a good driver does too. Situational awareness.

    Many bike riders are hit from behind. Many bike riders do not have a mirror. Many bike riders do not take responsibility for their own safety (by making choices about their position on the road. For example, on a narrow bitumen road with either no sealed verge, or a narrow sealed verge . . .

    1. Car or truck coming towards them. Car or truck coming from behind and will overtake the rider in same vicinity as the oncoming car passing.
    2. Rider approaching a blind corner, or a blind crest. with a vehicle coming from behind, and likely to overtake the rider in the dangerous section of road from about 200m before the blind point.
    3. Rider exiting a blind point on the road, corner or crest, with another blind corner/crest very close ahead i.e twisty roads through the hills.

    If a rider does not have a mirror, a fit for purpose mirror, or has a mirror and/or does not understand the danger of being hit from behind occurs, and does not know the probabilities of drivers not using their brakes to wait until safe to overtake, or does not have the various skills and/or equipment (suitable tyres that can handle some loose gravel if needed) then that rider is putting their safety inot the hands of the driver!

    So I would like to see some recommendations re mirrors, the first step of ‘system of car/bike control explained (know the situation all around them, especially behind – the need of a good mirror), the danger situations affecting rider safety (approaching vehicles on narrow roads, blind points ahead) where the second step of the ‘system of bike control’ (the need to change speed or direction or position on the road to maximise safety), and the need for suitable tyres if the decision is to leave the tarmac.

    Here is just one link for the system of car control. There are thousands! Just as applicable to cyclists as to drivers. More so IMO as cyclists tolerance to collisons is far less than for a driver! Step #1 – Have a mirror and know how/when to use it!
    http://www.roadar-nlsh.org.uk/an-introduction-to-the-system-of-car-control/

  2. John Mills says:

    Sorry, I should have edited that comment above. Here is my second, and I hope more readable version . . .

    I would like to see some recommendations in the safety section regarding the importance of not only being seen by drivers but that riders SEE THE DRIVER.

    I believe a good driver is a defensive driver. A defensive driver requires the skills of
    1. ‘Situational awareness’ (knowing what is around them that might affect the way they control their vehicle to avoid accidents.
    2. Using that knowledge of the surrounding situation to adjust their speed, position on the road, and possibly the need to change course entirely,
    3. Having the skills and vehicle roadworthiness to safely and effectively be able to make those changes.

    Of course having a good knowledge base helps considerably – past experience, learned knowledge from various sources, . . .

    I believe that all of the above is just as applicable to cyclists as to drivers. We are in control of a vehicle. We are on the roads . . .

    One of the most important pieces of equipment on a motor vehicle is the rear view mirror.

    I would like to see some encouragement/recommendations that our Audax cyclists seriously consider the fitting of a ‘fit for purpose’ rear view mirror.
    By ’fit for purpose’ I mean a mirror that is able to give the rider a good image of vehicles that are at least 400m away, or even more. Curved mirrors do not do that.

    As a driving instructor of about ten years’ experience the first step in the defensive driving regime called ‘a system of car control’ is to observe what is happening around them , observational skills, scanning, just as a good pilot does to avoid mid-air collisions, and a good driver does too. Situational awareness!

    Many bike riders are hit from behind. Many bike riders do not have a mirror. Many bike riders do not take responsibility for their own safety, by not making choices about their position on the road.. Examples of where and when a rider should consider changing their position on the road are;

    . . . on a narrow bitumen road with either no sealed verge, or a narrow sealed verge, and . . .
    1. A car or truck coming towards them. Car or truck coming from behind and will overtake the rider in same vicinity as the oncoming car passing, or.
    2. A rider approaching a blind corner, or a blind crest with a vehicle coming from behind, and likely to overtake the rider in the dangerous section of road from about 200m before the blind point, or
    3. A rider exiting a blind point on the road, corner or crest, with another blind corner/crest very close ahead i.e. twisty roads through the hills.

    If a rider does not have a mirror, a fit for purpose mirror, or has a mirror and –
    – does not understand when the danger of being hit from behind occurs,
    – or does not know the probabilities of drivers not using their brakes to wait until safe to overtake,
    – or does not have the various skills and/or equipment (suitable tyres that can handle some loose gravel if needed) . . .
    . . . then that rider is putting their safety into the hands of the driver!

    So I would like to see some recommendations re mirrors, the first step of ‘system of car/bike control explained –
    1. Know the situation all around them, especially behind – hence the need of a good mirror), and
    – know the danger situations affecting rider safety (approaching vehicles on narrow roads, blind points ahead)

    Also understand the second step of the ‘system of car/bike control’
    2. Understand the need to change speed or direction or position on the road to maximise safety.

    For example a rider may decide the best course of action is to leave the narrow sealed section and move onto the gravel verge, so that two cars, or two trucks, or a car Vs truck can pass each other without risking the rider’s life!,
    So the need for suitable width tyres if the decision is to leave the tarmac.

    Another possible action is that 1. having noted a blind corner abut 400m ahead, then 2. checked the mirror and seen a vehicle approaching from behind, the first two stages of a system of car control, . . .

    instead of just continuing towards that blind corner at speed, the rider might simply decide to slow down a bit, until that vehicle has gone past. If that overtake has happened at least 200m before the blind spot, then even if another vehicle appears from that blind spot, then there is no danger to the cyclist. Where-as if the cyclist had continued on at speed, . . . .!

    Here is just one link for the ‘system of car control’. There are many from all around the world! Including most states of Australia. It is just as applicable to cyclists as to drivers. More so IMO as a cyclist’s tolerance to a collision is far less than for a driver! Step #1 –

    In just a few words – Have a mirror and know how and when to use it!

    http://www.roadar-nlsh.org.uk/an-introduction-to-the-system-of-car-control/

  3. John Mills says:

    The System of Car Control (Defensive Driving)
    and the Use of a Mirror on a Bicycle

    I would like to see some recommendations in the Audax safety section regarding the importance of not only being seen by drivers but that riders see the driver..

    I believe a good driver is a defensive driver. A defensive driver uses the simple system called The System of Car Control. It has four basic steps, and is used to train drivers throughout Australia and around the world.

    It is also used to train motor cycle riders, and since we are road users, in control of a vehicle, a two wheeled vehicle, I believe it is very relevant to cyclists too.

    It was first devised by the US Air Force in the 1950s to stop their members from dying – not in the skies, but on the roads going to and from work!

    The four main steps in this system to avoiding an accident are.

    1. Continually scan ahead and behind to observe what is around you (‘Situational awareness’)

    2. Based on past experience and knowledge, having observed a potentially dangerous situation ahead, check your mirror to know the full situation at that moment.

    3. Using the observed information and previous experience and learning, decide on the best course of action to avoid a collision.

    4. Then Act. That might mean adjusting speed, position on the road, direction, or a combination of them..

    Having a good knowledge base helps considerably – past experience, learned knowledge from various sources, ,an education initiative from an organization (such as Audax Australia), . . .

    Also having the skills and vehicle roadworthiness to safely and effectively be able to make those changes is important.

    I believe that all of the above is just as applicable to cyclists as to drivers. After all, we are in control of a vehicle. We are on the roads. . . .

    One of the most important pieces of equipment on a motor vehicle is the rear view mirror.
    I would like to see recommendations that our Audax cyclists seriously consider fitting of a ‘fit for purpose’ rear view mirror.

    By ’fit for purpose’ I mean a mirror that is able to give the rider a good image of vehicles that are at least 400m away, or even more. Curved mirrors do not do that.

    Many bike riders are hit from behind. Many bike riders do not have a mirror. Many bike riders are therefore not taking responsibility for their own safety. They are not making choices about their position on the road when they need to.

    If a rider does not have a mirror, a fit for purpose mirror, or has a mirror and –
    – does not understand when the danger of being hit from behind occurs,
    – or does not know the probabilities of drivers not using their brakes to wait until safe to overtake,
    – or does not have the various skills and/or equipment (suitable tyres that can handle some loose gravel if needed) . . .
    . . . then that rider is putting their safety into the hands of the driver!

    So I would like to see our riders learn about the dangerous situations where a rider needs to see, think and then act to avoid a collision. i.e. have the back-ground knowledge to be able to effectively put the system of defensive cycling into action when they need to. .

    Step 1. Observe the situation ahead, recognise that it has the potential for a collision and so . . .

    Step 2. Check the mirror to know the full situation around them..
    .
    Some common situations that I recognise on every ride are

    a) 1. See a vehicle approaching from in front (trigger) on a narrow road, 2. check mirror, and note that a vehicle is also approaching from behind – the ‘three way crossover’ – vehicle/bike/vehicle all trying to share the same piece of narrow road.

    b) 1. See a blind bend ahead (trigger) , so 2. check the mirror and see if a vehicle approaching from behind – the late, unsafe overtake.

    c) the same with a blind crest ahead.

    d) On hilly routes – exiting of blind points, (monitor the mirror until safely away) especially if they see that there is another blind point not far ahead from the first.

    Of course there are many others – round-a-bouts, heavy traffic, impaired visibility situations, animals or pedestrians crossing too close in front, . . .

    Then having observed and understood the danger . . .

    Step 3 .Think, decide and then . . .

    Step 4. Act accordingly.

    Some examples –

    For example a) above, the ‘three way cross-over;

    The rider may decide the best course of action is to leave the narrow sealed section and move onto the gravel verge, so that two cars, or two trucks, or a car Vs truck can pass each other without risking the rider’s life!
    ,
    (Hence the need for suitable width tyres if the decision is to leave the tarmac)

    For example b) above, the ‘blind bend ahead’

    Having noted a blind corner abut 400m ahead, then checked the mirror and seen that a vehicle is approaching from behind, (the first two stages of a system of car control) Instead of just continuing towards that blind corner at speed, the rider might simply decide to slow down a bit, until that vehicle has gone past.

    If that overtake has happened at least 200m before the blind spot, then even if another vehicle appears from that blind spot, then there is no danger to the cyclist. Where-as if the cyclist had continued on at speed, . . . .!

    The System of Car Control It is just as applicable to cyclists as to drivers. More so IMO as a cyclist’s tolerance to a collision is far less than for a driver!

    Step #1 – Scan the situation ahead (and recognise a danger when you see it)
    Step #2 – Check your mirror to get the full picture – the full situation that are in!
    Step #3 – Based on the observations, front, back and side, decide on best course of action
    Step #4 – Act – change speed, direction, or position.

    (if time, signal to other road users. But sometimes there is no time! And on a bike, taking a hand of the bar can be in itself dangerous!

    Without seeing the whole situation (no mirror), and without the knowledge and experience it is very hard to do the thinking, to make a good decision, on the best course of action

    Without a mirror, you are only ever going to see half the ‘story’. And much of the danger comes from behind!

    Below is just one link to the system of car / motor-bike / bicycle control.
    There are many. All with their slight variation to their title, but otherwise basically the same – See (front and back), Think, Act

    http://www.roadar-nlsh.org.uk/an-introduction-to-the-system-of-car-control/

    1. Tom Nankivell says:

      Thanks for your comments and suggestions, John. I shall forward them on to my colleagues on the Risk & Safety Committee for consideration. Tom

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